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Zeek Magazine Special Issue on Reconstructionist Judaism


Zeek: A Jewish Journal of Thought and Culture
devoted its fall 2010 issue to an exploration of why the Reconstructionist movement "works." RRC's professor of Jewish spirituality and philosophy, Jacob Staub, served as guest editor. This page contains links to PDFs of articles by RRC faculty and graduates.
 

 
Rabbi Jacob Staub,
'77, Ph.D.

Staub recounts his spiritual biography and offers ideas about how to build a personal relationship with God. 

Read the article


Rabbi Joshua
Boettiger, '06

Boettiger wrestles with the possibilities for Jewish art and creative pursuits.

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Rabbi Isabel de Koninck, '09

De Koninck explains the potential of the Reconstructionist movement to meet Jews wherever they are.

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Rabbi Deborah Glanzberg-Krainin,
'96, Ph.D.

Glanzberg-Krainin explores how Reconstructionist Judaism draws on diverse traditions to create a relevant contemporary Judaism.

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Rabbi Nancy
Fuchs-Kreimer,
'82, Ph.D.

Fuchs-Kreimer describes how respect for interfaith colleagues led her to re-examine Jewish beliefs she once dismissed out of hand. 

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 Rabbi Amy Klein, '96

Klein examines how experiencing the contradictions of Israeli life can help young North American Jews feel connected to Israel.

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Rabbi Joshua
Lesser, '99

Lesser describes the evolution of an LGBT synagogue and dissects the meaning of inclusive community.

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Rabbi Elliott
Tepperman, '02

Tepperman encourages sustained congregational dialogue and action around social, environmental and political justice.

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Rabbi Deborah Waxman, '99, Ph.D.

Waxman asks if it is “possible to believe that all people are created equal and to believe that Judaism is superior to other religions.”

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Rabbi Benjamin
Weiner, '08

Weiner ponders the "authenticity" of past generations and looks to Reconstructionist community as the place where the various strains of Judaism’s past can come together.

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