Graduate-Level Courses Open to the Public | Reconstructionist Rabbinical College

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Graduate-Level Courses Open to the Public

Interested in deepening your Jewish learning and studying alongside our rabbinical students? Every semester, we invite members of the general public to take certain courses. We hope to see you in our classrooms.

Spring semester begins the week of Feb. 11, 2020. All courses are in Eastern time.

 


 

Current Tuition Schedule

Non-Matriculated Student Fees
Not for Credit $500 per course $180 per workshop
For Credit $1,250 per credit  
Online Biblical Hebrew Course $750  
RRC Alumni/RRA Member $50 per course $50 per workshop
Member of a community affiliated with Reconstructing Judaism (not for credit) $360 per course $180 per workshop
Jewish Professional (not for credit) $180 for the first course, $360 additional courses $150 per workshop

 


Spring 2020 Courses

 

JEWISH ART FOR RESISTANCE AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Instructor: Sharon Gershoni, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Tuesday from 2 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Course Description: Art fosters civic engagement and has real social impact. It promotes awareness, dialogue, understanding, healing and action. Art can bring change. We will see how artists shaped Jewish identity and brought about community engagement and social change in the past and the present. We will also make art in a range of modalities, and explore ways rabbis can use art to teach and to engage the community.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Sharon Gershoni, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

JEWISH TRADITIONS II

Instructor: Rabbi Jacob Staub, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Monday 9:30 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Course Description: The second part of a two semester intensive study of traditional Jewish beliefs and practices with work done both in and outside of the classroom. Heavy emphasis is placed on original texts in translation, chiefly Bible and Mishnah, and other skills and lab sessions on prayer and home observances. Other main areas of study are the methodology and development of halakhah, festival observance, life-cycle rituals, male-female and family relations and ethics. Accompanying the class is a weekly learner’s minyan.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Rabbi Jacob Staub, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

MEKHINAH RABBINIC HEBREW

Instructor: Rabbi Vivie Mayer

Meeting Details: Tuesday 9:30 a.m. to 11:20 a.m. and Wednesday 10:30 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

Course Description: This course continues to introduce students to the poetic language of classical, Rabbinic-era prayer, and the discursive language of the Mishnah through selected texts of the Passover haggadah and Mishnah Tractate Pesachim. Students build vocabulary and learn to recognize syntactical and literary forms. The students encounter central theological themes within classical Judaism through the exploration of the prayers, halakhot and midrashim of the Mishnah and the haggadah.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Rabbi Vivie Mayer directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW II - III

Instructor: Sharon Gershoni, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Monday and Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.

Course Notes: Pre-requisite: Intermediate Modern Hebrew

Course Description: This sequence develops Hebrew comprehension and communication skills through a mix of immersive learning and extended study structured around conversation, instruction and text.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Sharon Gershoni, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

MODERN CORE - CIVILIZATION

Instructor: Reena Sigman Friedman, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Wednesday 9:30 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

Course Description: This survey of modern Jewish history, from the mid-17th century through the mid-20th century, will explore the transformation of Jewish identity and communal life in response to the unprecedented challenges of the modern era. Emphasis will be placed upon the evolution of the rabbi’s role in a changing world.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Reena Sigman Friedman, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

MODERN CORE - THOUGHT

Instructor: Joel Hecker, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Thursday 10:30 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

Course Description: Jewish thinkers in every period have re-examined and re-interpreted Jewish ideas and texts in light of shifting intellectual currents. In the modern period, the integration of Jews into western society and the Jewish absorption of western culture and values have necessitated a profound rethinking of classical elements of Judaism. Belief in a creator and revelation, Jewish chosenness, the sacred authority of Scripture—these and other central tenets of Judaism were rendered problematic for many Jews and could no longer be upheld in traditional terms. Reading texts in translation, we shall examine various expressions of this phenomenon. The seminar will concentrate upon a number of Jewish thinkers and their writings on Judaism in light of contemporary philosophical and religious speculation and with an eye to the ways in which older conceptions have been transvalued.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Joel Hecker, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

PARSHANUT

Instructor: Rabbi Jacob Staub, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Monday from 1:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. and Beit Midrash on Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Course Description: A study of the commentaries on selected biblical texts of such medieval commentators as Rashi, Rashbam, Ibn Ezra, Radaq, Rambam and Sforno. Attention is focused upon the presuppositions and methods of medieval biblical exegesis in general, and upon the particular concerns of each of the commentators.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email Rabbi Jacob Staub, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.

 

TANAKH II

Instructor: S. Tamar Kamionkowski, Ph.D.

Meeting Details: Monday from 1:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

Course Description: Students will work with lexical resources and critical commentaries to build biblical Hebrew-translation skills and to cultivate the ability to recognize nuances in the text. The course engages readings that explore biblical texts from a variety of perspectives. During the first semester, students will focus on narrative texts; during the second, they will focus on poetic texts, especially those that are haftarot or appear in the liturgy.

To inquire about taking this course as a non-matriculated student, please email S. Tamar Kamionkowski, Ph.D., directly. Be sure to include the course title in your email.